Dining Well In Sevilla – Part 1

Gourmet Dining in Sevilla

Dining options in Sevilla have certainly changed over the past 15 years when the majority of places only offered the traditional dishes; pescaíto frito (fried fish), jamon, coquinas (little clams, exquisite), gambas al ajillo (prawns sizzled in garlicky chili oil), arroz con mariscos (rice with seafood), chipirones a la plancha (grilled squid), salmorejo (smooth tomato soup), gazpacho, Tortilla española, and tapas of all kinds.  But now we have a variety of excellent gastronomic options to choose from.

Canabota-19-01e

 

Cañabota

A small grey shark found off the Galician coast.

Located in the center of the city at Calle José Gestoso, 19, on the corner of Orfila, has quickly gained the reputation as one of the country’s great fish restaurants.  Every product, fin fish or shell fish is impeccably sourced, shipped in daily from the very best available  seafood arriving at the Andalusian piers and prepared lovingly by the six talented chefs, including Argentinian Marcos Nieto, who trained with the Michelin starred Roca brothers at Roca Moo and Paco Pérez at Miramar in Catalunya, working in an open kitchen.  

At the front of the white-tiled, sleek design space, mimicking the look a traditional pescadería, you’ll pass a raw fish display, where the father of the owner keeps busy with the prep work, and from which you can choose your specimen.  Then you will face the counter with seating for nine (?) diners directly facing the chefs, sushi bar style, which is the best perch to watch the careful execution of these incredible dishes on the plancha and the charcoal grill.  The rest of the small space consists of high tables placed next to the large windows and at the back, a large glass enclosed wine cellar.  There are several daily off-menu dishes that the owner, Juanlu Fernández Gálvez will explain to you and indicate the pricing of these items.  All fish is priced at 52,50€ per kilo.  The excellent bread comes from Sanlúcar la Mayor.  Read the review by Azahar Sevilla.  Reservations required with a credit card.  Closed Sundays.

We began our recent lunch with an original “Bloody Mary” amuse (a vodka laced, iced tomato), then moved on to a sparkling prawn tartar, squid filled with pork belly, giant Scarlet prawns (carabineros) and a perfectly grilled urta, red bream from Rota but served without any accompanying vegetables.  Service is both friendly and impeccable.  One must now reserve in advance to snag one of the 30 coveted seats.  It sports a Bib Gourmand designation in this year’s Michelin Guide, is also Repsol Guide recommended and won “the best creative restaurant of the year” Gurmén Sevilla award in 2018.  Michelin-starred chefs, such as Córdoba’s Paco Morales of Noor and José Andrés have been recent happy diners here.

Tel: (+34) 954 870 298 

The long awaited La Barra de Cañabota is now open at Orfila, 5, next to the church.  It has  the same busy, buzzy feel as the original.  There is a long bar and a few tall tables plus the same sleek, white tiled pescadería look and floor to ceiling windows overlooking the street.  Juanlu and his team offer a small, well-balanced menu of fried, boiled or grilled fish and meat, and several cold dishes like ensaladilla de gambas and boquerones al vinagre.  A small sidewalk terrace will be coming soon. “Well worth the wait” remarks Shawn of Azahar Sevilla.  Closed Sundays.

Tel: (+34) 954 913 432  

T by ConTenedor

Brand new in the Alfalfa neighborhood is a unique gastronomic venture by ConTenedor; 16 seats for 16 people and the chef, with the entrance at Calle Boteros, 4, a small street just off Plaza Alfalfa.  Three menus; 5 dishes for 55€/person, 7 dishes  for 75€/person or 10 dishes for 95€/person, with wine parings available.  By reservation only.  See the review by Azahar Sevilla.  Open Friday and Saturday nights.

Tel: (+34) 954 319 351

El Gallinero de Sandra

Pasaje Esperanza Elena Caro, 2, in the walkway between Calle Amor de Dios and Calle Trajano, in the Alameda de Hércules district, is the one highly regarded sit-down gourmet experience that we have yet to try.  Patrons rave about its version of “broken eggs” and the ajoblanco, white almond gazpacho, with smoked trout.  The restaurant has adopted a “hen” decorative theme and has an open kitchen and a large terrace.  This year’s Michelin guide awards it a Bib Gourmand designation for value, it’s recommended as well by the Repsol Guide and has received an excellent review from El País and ABC Sevilla.  The chef, Nacho Dargallo, trained at El Bulli and was second in command in the kitchen of Hacienda Benazuza when it was an El Bulli hotel.  He brings his fish and crustaceans in daily from the piers of Cádiz and Huelva.  See the review by Azahar Sevilla.  Closed Sundays.  

Tel: (+34) 954 909 931

Jaylu

At Calle López de Gomara, 19, in Triana, is considered by locals a seafood temple, a local jewel, where chef Enrique Caballero serves the very finest fish and crustaceans from the piers in the Cádiz and Huelva provinces, along with the finest Iberian ham by 5Js.  With veteran waiters, white tablecloth draped tables, marble floors, soft lighting and a notable wine list, it resembles Madrid’s finest seafood restaurant, Marisquería Rafa.  One can also dine well here by sampling a ham platter, the famous ensaladilla with crab and Retinto beef tenderloin with fries  at the bar.  Jaylu boasts one Repsol sun in the 2019 guide.  Open daily for lunch from 12:30 pm to 4:30 pm and Monday-Saturday for dinner from 8:30 to midnight.

Tel: (+34) 954 339 476

 

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